Bay Centre for Birth Control


To learn more about how to access care and services at the Bay Centre for Birth Control, click here.  

At the forefront of reproductive healthcare

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Pictured Above: Dr. Marian Powell

Since trailblazers like Women’s College Hospital’s Dr. Marion Powell began fighting to legalize birth control in Canada over 50 years ago, WCH has been at the forefront of advancing access to reproductive health care for women. Thanks in part to Dr. Powell’s tireless efforts, legislation decriminalizing contraception in Canada was passed in June 1969, finally providing women the right to plan their families how they see fit.
 
Even after this milestone achievement, Women’s College Hospital remained instrumental in ensuring that all women in the community had access to birth control, sexual and reproductive health information and counselling through the launch of the Bay Centre for Birth Control – Toronto’s first hospital-based, walk-in family planning clinic.
 
Since then, the landscape of reproductive and contraceptive care has continued to evolve and so too have the services offered by the Bay Centre. Although many barriers still exist, particularly for women from marginalized and underserved communities, the Bay Centre is finding revolutionary ways to close gaps in access. These include the launch of a compassionate fund established in partnership with Women’s College Hospital Foundation for patients who are unable to afford contraception, and the opening of a drop-in Pap test clinic to provide women with screening, treatment and education without requiring an appointment. 
 
The Centre also provides access to the new medical abortion pill, Mifegymiso. Available in Canada since 2017, Mifegymiso has had a revolutionary impact on women’s health. The safe, non-surgical abortion option can be administered in the privacy of a woman’s home and, since becoming available, has reduced the number of surgical abortions by half. Following Mifegymiso treatment, patients can access follow-up care via a telephone appointment, allowing women travelling from out of town the option to check in with their care provider without having to return to the hospital – an expensive and time consuming barrier that may have previously prevented some women from accessing care.